Evangelism


To love your neighbor, you need to know your neighbor.  To help you do that, Ben Stevens, over at the Gospel Coalition blog, offers six tried and tested practical suggestions.  Read it to help you in your evangelism.

A.W. Tozer has said, “Nothing is new that matters and nothing that matters can be modernized.  The old way is the true way and there is no new way.”

And C.H. Spurgeon has said, “Clean the grand old pictures of the divine masters; hang them up in new frames; fix them on the walls of your people’s memories, and their well-instructed hearts shall bless you.”

I am thankful this year for the men and women of the Christian faith that have went before me.  And a book I just finished that reminded me of this great blessing is by Ian Murray called The Old Evangelicalism: Old Truths for a New AwakeningIt is probably one of the best books I’ve read in a long time.  It’s an instant classic in my view and I’m sure not that many know of Ian Murray.  This man has labored well in keeping those “old” pilgrims of the faith before us.  Below are the Table of Contents from the book.

Table of Contents:

1. Preaching and Awakening: Facing the Main Problem in Evangelism

2. Spurgeon and True Conversion

3. Christ our Righteousness: God’s Way of Salvation

4. The Cross: The Pulpit of God’s Love

5. What Can We Learn from John Wesley?

6. Assurance of Salvation

7. Christian Unity and Church Unity

D.A. Carson has written a book called The God Who Is There: Finding Your Place in God’s Story.  It looks like an excellent book for small groups or to give to someone you are developing a relationship with to share the gospel (there is a corresponding leader’s guide as well).  The book comes from a 14-part seminar so aptly entitled “The God Who Is There” which took place at Bethlehem Baptist Church’s North Campus in Minneapolis.  The series will serve the church well because it simultaneously evangelizes non-Christians and edifies Christians by explaining the Bible’s storyline in a non-reductionistic way.  It’s one thing to know the Bible’s storyline, but it’s another to know one’s role in God’s ongoing story of redemption.  The God Who Is There engages people at the worldview-level.

What is really exciting is the fact that you can listen now to MP3s (full) of each seminar, as well as sample a video (10-minute previews) of the seminar.  There is supposed to be a DVD small group / class series coming out soon.

  1. The God Who Made Everything | MP3 | Video Preview
  2. The God Who Does Not Wipe Out Rebels | MP3 | Video Preview
  3. The God Who Writes His Own Agreements | MP3 | Video Preview
  4. The God Who Legislates | MP3 | Video Preview
  5. The God Who Reigns | MP3 | Video Preview
  6. The God Who Is Unfathomably Wise | MP3 | Video Preview
  7. The God Who Becomes a Human Being | MP3 | Video Preview
  8. The God Who Grants New Birth | MP3 | Video Preview
  9. The God Who Loves | MP3 | Video Preview
  10. The God Who Dies—and Lives Again | MP3 | Video Preview
  11. The God Who Declares the Guilty Just | MP3 | Video Preview
  12. The God Who Gathers and Transforms His People | MP3 | Video Preview
  13. The God Who Is Very Angry | MP3 | Video Preview
  14. The God Who Triumphs | MP3 | Video Preview

Today, of course, is St. Patrick’s Day.  It’s also my wife’s birthday!  I bet most of you didn’t know that.  Of course, this means she gets inundated with everything green.

But, St. Patricks isn’t about green things, shamrocks, lerechauns, and the like.  Bottom line, God used Patrick in his role as a missionary and pastor.  Russel Moore writes on what evangelicals can learn from St. Patrick.  A small sample, he writes…

Any evangelical seeking to kindle a love for missions among the people of God will benefit from this volume’s demonstration that the Great Commission did not lie dormant between the apostle Paul and William Carey. Patrick’s love and zeal for the Irish may also inspire American evangelicals to repent of our hopelessness for the conversion of, say, the radical Islamic world—which is, after all, no more “hopeless” than the Irish barbarians of Patrick’s era.

Reid Monaghan, from Acts29 churches, gives a small biography on St. Patrick, and Mark Driscoll writes on why St. Patrick was one of the greatest missionaries to ever live.

For the answer as to why X is used in Xmas (and really doesn’t mean disrespect), read this from RC Sproul.

Facing family tensions this Christmas? Click here for some wise guidance.

Want some practical tips on sharing Christ this Christmas?  Click here.

If this was too short of a post for you… it’s because I’m helping my wife clean the bathrooms!  How’s that for multi-tasking!

Yesterday was Yom Kippur, one of the most important Jewish holidays.  Where I used to live there was a large Jewish population, many whom I was friends with.  Justin Holcomb on the Resurgence blog has a great explanation what Yom Kippur is and how Christ fulfills it.  Read it here.

And if you know someone who is Jewish take them out for a cup of coffee and ask them about their holiday.

The musician Regina Spektor is not a Christian.  She’s Jewish with a Russian background, but I thought the lyrics from this song are quite profound.  The song comments on the fact that suffering has a way of stripping away our flippant attitude towards God, His existence, and involvement.  In an interview she said,

“I’m always fascinated with faith, religion, and spirituality, and what those things are to each other, or how they come together or don’t come together. When I was done with this record I was like, ‘Whoa, I have a lot of stuff here that’s just about, like, religion.’ Which is amazing. It wasn’t planned, but it’s one of those concepts that my mind is just fascinated with, and I’m always mulling over.”

The above quote is just another piece of evidence that western culture is ripe for evangelism.  They want God, but they don’t know the way that God has provided through Jesus Christ.  Question is, will we, as Christians, show and tell the gospel to a hurting and lost world?  Listen to the song, and the lyrics are included below…

“Laughing With” Lyrics:

No one laughs at God in a hospital
No one laughs at God in a war
No one’s laughing at God when they’re starving or freezing or so very poor

No one laughs at God when the doctor calls after some routine tests
No one’s laughing at God when it’s gotten real late and their kid’s not back from that party yet

No one laughs at God when their airplane starts to uncontrollably shake
No one’s laughing at God when they see the one they love hand in hand with someone else and they hope that they’re mistaken
No one laughs at God when the cops knock on their door and they say “We’ve got some bad new, sir,”
No one’s laughing at God when there’s a famine, fire or flood

But God can be funny
At a cocktail party while listening to a good God-themed joke or
Or when the crazies say he hates us and they get so red in the head you think that they’re about to choke

God can be funny
When told he’ll give you money if you just pray the right way
And when presented like a genie
Who does magic like Houdini
Or grants wishes like Jiminy Cricket and Santa Claus

God can be so hilarious
Ha ha
Ha ha

No one laughs at God in a hospital
No one laughs at God in a war
No one’s laughing at God when they’ve lost all they got and they don’t know what for

No one laughs at God on the day they realize that the last sight they’ll ever see is a pair of hateful eyes
No one’s laughing at God when they’re saying their goodbyes

But God can be funny
At a cocktail party while listening to a good God-themed joke or
Or when the crazies say he hates us and they get so red in the head you think that they’re about to choke

God can be funny
When told he’ll give you money if you just pray the right way
And when presented like a genie
Who does magic like Houdini
Or grants wishes like Jiminy Cricket and Santa Claus

God can be so hilarious

No one laughs at God in a hospital
No one laughs at God in a war

No one laughs at God in a hospital
No one laughs at God in a war

No one’s laughing at God in a hospital
No one’s laughing at God in a war

No one’s laughing at God when they’re starving or freezing or so very poor

No one’s laughing at God
No one’s laughing at God
No one’s laughing at God
We’re all laughing with God

Laughing With by Regina Spektor from the album Far

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